Category Archives: Immigrants

Canadians expose foreign worker ‘mess’ in oilsands, By Kathy Tomlinson, CBC News

Canadian tradesmen from a huge oilsands construction project are waving a red flag about safety hazards and near misses, which they blame on the use of foreign workers who aren’t qualified and can’t speak English.

“When you bring in a bunch of workers who are unqualified to do this job it’s only a matter of time before you kill someone,” said Les Jennings, who was an ironworker supervisor at the Husky Sunrise plant until a few weeks ago, when he quit in frustration.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/canadians-expose-foreign-worker-mess-in-oilsands-1.2750730?cmp=rss

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More immigration means less unemployment, EU says

According to the report, low-skilled migrants also have their place in Europe’s labour markets, as allow for the employment of natives in highly-skilled occupations and compensate for shortages of low-skilled workers in industries where they are needed. 

“The more immigration you have the less unemployment you have and this is mainly for two reasons; because migrants are attracted by employment and because they adapt to the situation. When unemployment increases too much they try to find a solution for themselves and perhaps they will leave also.” said Migration Policy Centre’s director Philippe Fargues.

http://www.euractiv.com/video/more-immigration-means-less-unemployment-eu-says-307723?utm_source=EurActiv+Newsletter&utm_campaign=16b394bc1e-newsletter_social_europe__jobs&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_bab5f0ea4e-16b394bc1e-245775009

Needing Skilled Workers, a Booming Germany Woos Immigrants By ALISON SMALE JULY 18, 2014

Needing Skilled Workers, a Booming Germany Woos Immigrants

But more than the rest of Europe, its healthy economy needs additional workers, especially for jobs requiring high levels of training and education, a problem likely to be exacerbated in the long run by its low birthrate. Right now Germany is trying to fill 117,000 jobs in science, technology and engineering, a gap that may widen to as many as one million by 2020, according to the Cologne Institute for Economic Research.

Building a bridge to Canadian career Program helps immigrants adjust to culture and find relevant employment

Building a bridge to Canadian career Program helps immigrants adjust to culture and find relevant employment

… York University’s bridging program for internationally educated professionals (IEPs). The innovative 18-month certificate program helps immigrants trained abroad adjust to Canadian business culture, and find employment that matches their credentials and experience.

A European labour market is slowly taking shape Posted by Eberhard Rhein

 In the future, we should expect more movements, driven by increasing scarcity of skilled labour in the wealthier countries like Germany and Scandinavia. Hopefully, this will progressively lead to a change of mentalities and better understanding: when migrant “workers” return home after five to ten years they will take with them a huge pack of experience and maybe the wish to open a business of their own. Labour migration might turn thus into powerful catalyst for a “European society.”

http://rhein.blogactiv.eu/2014/07/02/a-european-labour-market-is-slowly-taking-shape/?utm_source=EurActiv+Newsletter&utm_campaign=c66e272c0d-newsletter_infosociety&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_bab5f0ea4e-c66e272c0d-245775009

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Germany relaxes immigration rules to attract skilled labour

“But this month the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) said Germany must liberalize the recruitment of foreigners to fill a projected shortfall of 5.4 million workers with vocational or tertiary qualifications by 2025.

German business welcomed the new rules. The BDA employers’ federation said it would “facilitate the targeted immigration of badly-needed skilled labour also in non-academic areas”, citing a particular shortage of skills in engineering and electronics.

It welcomed a “change of mentality” that would make foreign workers feel more welcome.

Many would-be migrants are put off by having to learn German, but language schools such as the Goethe Institute now report record enrolments while more German firms are starting to accept English as the language of the workplace.”